PAPER MAGAZINE, NYC

TEN LEGENDARY CLUB OWNERS FROM NYC’S NIGHTLIFE GOLDEN ERA
by Michael Musto    15-7-2017

A nightclub without a fab owner and/or promoter is just a space with some people in it. The people that run the place and draw the crowds have to be magnetic, colorful, and professional enough that you’ll want to go to their events more than once — and they should considerably add to the party, not just sit at their registers, counting the cash. Here are some of the more memorable impresarios from the olden days of NYC nightlife:

STEVE RUBELL  
The Brooklyn-born Rubell was the personality behind the legendary Studio 54, the ultimate ’70s disco, which he co-owned with spark and aplomb. The doorman was a snoot, but Rubell loved press, so he’d spot me in the outdoor throng, pull me in, and tell me which superstars were scheduled to show up that night. Rubell also co-owned the ’80s megaclub the Palladium, by which point he was still spunky, but in a somewhat mellower tone, having been through ups and downs (and prison for tax evasion). He died of AIDS in 1989, leaving a legacy of good-time thump-thumping
ERIC GOODE
The Rhode Island-born conservationist made a splash by joining with his brother and some other partners to open Area, the art-drenched ’80s club which changed its theme every five weeks, doing so with elaborate motifs and real artistic vision. Eric was always a lanky charmer, who seemed a little out of place in such a wild and woolly venue, but he brought heart and soul to it, going on to create B Bar and take over Bowery Hotel.

RUDOLF PIPER
The German club god helped bring us the legendary, multi-floor rock club Danceteria, about which he aptly said, “That place had an un-fucking-believable magic.” With busty “It girl” Dianne Brill on his arm, Rudolf was always affable, witty, and aware of the larger artistic issues that drove a late-night good time. He’s currently working his magic in Brazil.

STEVEN GREENBERG
A rotund man with white hair, Steve was called “Ben Franklin” by many people — well, by me, anyway. He made his fortune on Wall Street and he went on to use it by opening the Roxy, co-owning the Palladium, and partnering on the Gramercy Park Hotel. Greenberg also owned the rooftop at 230-Fifth Avenue, where he threw a lavish 2010 party for me, hosted by Joan Rivers and Michael Urie. Greenberg pulled all the stops out with the booze and food, longing to play host to a bohemia-filled soiree that brought together different cultures — and we truly delivered for him. He died in 2012 and decreed in his will that money from 230-Fifth should be funneled to NYC hospitals.   (…)

Rudolf Piper

Rudolf Piper

Larry Tee

Larry Tee

CAFÉ DE LA MUSIQUE SP - PRESS
GLORY DAZE, filme, USA 2016